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Almanac Events
Visitors Marina Guide
SWALE MARINA

VHF

No VHF Watch

Call Sign

ACCESS

±2.5hrs HW

Berthing Rates

short stay:
not offered

overnight:
£16 for 8-12m

Book a Berth
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YHA Rating

not rated

Facilities

20KW card £3.60

30T

£7.50 per day

office hours

office hours

View plan
Swale

About the Marina


At the head of the Conyer Creek which leads off from the River Swale, is the idyllic haven of Swale Marina. Timber clad buildings with a slight North American theme blend in with the countryside which surrounds the attractive marina from all four quarters. The entire marina dries and provides around 200 mud berths on fully serviced pontoons and when the tide does come in, the marina can accommodate boats up to 2m draught. Visitors are very welcome here and they're entitled to use the adjoining club house which is usually open on weekends and provides hot food and drink.
For a yacht cruising this area the Swale Marina is well worth a visit. As part of the vast expanse of the North Kent Marshes, the area is renowned for its wildlife and is a favourite location for bird watcher and walkers. Indeed the famous Saxon Way passes around the marina leading the Gravesend to the west and all the way round to Hastings if you continued eastwards. Conyer village has a wooden theme to its houses and the local pub is just a short stroll away. The nearest shops and transport links are in Tyneham, about 1.5 miles to the south and the train station here is on the London to Dover line which passes through Canterbury, Chatham and Rochester.
 

Marina Approaches


The entrance to the Conyer Creek is just off Fowley Island in the River Swale. Yachts are left with the choice of two channels which eventually meet inside the Creek. The Butterfly Channel offers the deepest water and is marked by withies with port and starboard top marks. The Cut Channel starts in South Deep and offers the least amount of water but its the most popular of the two approaches and the channel is marked by superior port and starboard lateral buoys. The two channels meet at an ECM and thereafter the channel is marked by a blend of withies and buoys. All the marks are positioned at the top of the mud banks, so yachts should assume the deepest water is found in the centre of the channel. Pilotage is offered by the marina staff to visitors unfamiliar to these waters but this service is subject to availability of staff and adequate notice.
 

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